Events

Workshop: Demonology through the Ages

PhD student Olivia Garro (IHR HistoryLab chair) is organizing the workshop Demonology through the Ages: Beliefs, Ideas, Visual and Material Culture, with independent art curator Viola Moschettini. It is aimed at PGRs and ECRs and will take place at the Institute of Historical Research on March 8th. The CFPs deadline is February 9th. Please send abstracts and bios to garroo@uni.coventry.ac.uk

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Classical Association Conference 2024

CAMC will have a considerable presence at the Classical Association Conference, University of Warwick, in March 2024. We will showcase our research in a double-panel, ‘Classics in Coventry’, taking place 14.00-16.00 Friday 22 March and 12.00-13.00 on Sunday 24 March. The panels will include Daniel Anderson, Kirsty Harrod, Adeola Eze, Judith Mossman, Christopher Lillington-Martin, Helen Lord, and Georgina Homer.

A second event, the workshop Classics and Climate Action, will take place 11.30-13.30, Saturday 23 March. This collaboration between Victoria Leonard, Lucy Moore and Richard Nevell contributes to the Ecocriticism and the Environment Conference Theme. It addresses the urgent and critical global issue of climate change in relation specifically to Classics. It mobilises a crowd-sourced approach to climate action, bringing together expertise from leading Wikimedians to protect ancient sites on a global scale through Wikimedia. Please get in touch with Victoria Leonard (victoria.leonard@coventry.ac.uk) if you have any queries.

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Postgraduates Showcasing Research in Cultural Memory Seminar

On Tuesday 5 Dec, 14.00-16.00, the Cultural Memory Seminar Series will focus on exciting postgraduate research in CAMC. The seminar ‘Memory and the Archive’ will be led by Olivia Garro, Madeleine Bracey and Sarah Capel. Join us at the ICC Building in room G.21.

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Gendered Violence in Antiquity and Beyond Reading Group

September 2023

You are warmly invited to the next meeting of the Gendered Violence in Antiquity and Beyond Reading Group on Wednesday 27 September, 14.00-15.00. We will be reading Amanda McVitty’s article on gendered violence in premodern legal contexts (Past & Present, 2023, 1-32).

The Gendered Violence Reading Group aims to meet on or around the final Thursday of the month. For joining details, please email research.icc@coventry.ac.uk.

For any queries, please email Daniel Anderson (ac8883@coventry.ac.uk) or Victoria Leonard (ad5583@coventry.ac.uk). 

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Translating Plutarch Conference, 28-30 June 2023

The International Plutarch Society Conference is happening at Coventry University, 28-30 June 2023.

Organised by Prof. Judith Mossman, the Conference looks at the translation of Plutarch’s works into any language in any period, including Plutarch’s own translating. The conference will be held in Coventry, primarily in person, but remote participation will be available.

One session will take place in the Old Grammar School, a medieval building used as a classroom by Philemon Holland, a prolific translator who produced the first English version of the whole of Plutarch’s Moralia in 1603. Much of the conference will take place at the already iconic Delia Derbyshire Building.

For more information, including the programme, see here

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Image showing monochrome front cover of a translation of Plutarch's Moralia by Philemon Holland

Gendered Violence Reading Group – November 2022

You are warmly invited to the next meeting of the Gendered Violence Reading Group on Thursday 29 September, 3-4pm. We will be reading Kim Hall’s ‘Fair Texts/Dark Ladies: Renaissance Lyric and the Poetics of Color’, Things of Darkness (1995) 62-122.

The Gendered Violence Reading Group aims to meet on or around the final Thursday of the month. For joining details, please email research.icc@coventry.ac.uk.

For any queries, please email Daniel Anderson (ac8883@coventry.ac.uk) or Victoria Leonard (ad5583@coventry.ac.uk). 

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Ukrainians Past and Present in the English Media

As part of the Being Human Festival, Dr Katja Pilhuj is giving a talk on Ukrainian heroism, focusing on the seventeenth-century leader Bohdan Khmelnitsky. The event is happening 2-3pm on Wednesday 16 November at the Anglican Chapel in London Road Cemetery. This is walkable from the ICC building. Here is the address:

Anglican Chapel
London Road Cemetery
Coventry
CV1 2JT

For more information and to book a place, please see here: Ukrainians Past and Present in the English Media | Being Human Festival

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Autumn Lecture: Professor Judith Mossman

Coventry Premoderns are pleased to invite you to our Autumn Lecture, Thursday 13 October, 03:00 – 04:00 pm (GMT+1), ICC Building, room G21, and MS Teams

Professor Judith Mossman: ‘The Colours on the Wings of the Sphinx: Imagery and Metaphor in Plutarch’

This paper looks at aspects of Plutarch’s use of Imagery and Metaphor and attempts to set it in the context of his work. Far from being merely ornamental, his use of imagery contributes to the argument of many of his essays and introduces suggestive historical context to his lives.

All welcome! For further information, including online joining information, get in touch with research.icc@coventry.ac.uk. The address for the ICC Building (Institute of Creative Cultures) is: Parkside, Coventry University, Coventry, CV1 2NE

To register, please see here

Openwork furniture plaque with sphinx striding through a floral landscape, ca. 9th-8th century B.C., Fort Shalmaneser, Nimrud

Medieval Coventry Heritage Walk

Would you like to know more about Coventry’s fascinating medieval past?

Coventry was the fourth wealthiest city in medieval England, a centre for the wool trade, with incredibly vibrant culture, art and architecture.

Join this FREE 45-min heritage walk around the sites of architectural significance, with a team of experts from Coventry University.

We will walk to the Undercroft, up Bayley Lane and the Historic quarter, to St Mary’s Guildhall, Swanswell Gatehouse and city walls, finishing at the old Grammar School.

Join us on Thursday 13th October at 1pm, outside the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum. (Weather permitting) Led by Joanna Meredith (doctoral candidate), Dr Alice Leonard and Professor Juliet Simpson

No need to register, all welcome!

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For a full schedule of events 2022-23, please see here:

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Reading Group – Gendered Violence in Antiquity and Beyond

You are warmly invited to the next meeting of the Gendered Violence Reading Group on Tuesday 4 October, 3-4pm, on TEAMS (please note the change of date)

We will be reading Saidiya Hartman’s ‘Lose Your Mother’, Lose Your Mother. A Journey Along the Atlantic Slave Route (2021) 154-72

For any queries, including a copy of the reading and joining details, please email Daniel Anderson (ac8883@coventry.ac.uk) or Victoria Leonard (victoria.leonard@coventry.ac.uk)

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Spring Lecture

Join us on 13th June 2022, 3-4pm, when we launch Coventry Premoderns with the Spring Lecture by Professor Adam Smyth. Prof. Smyth will present the paper, ‘Material texts in early modern England: the case of waste paper’. The lecture will take place in the ICC building, room G21, and MS Teams. Please register here.

Abstract: In this paper, I’ll explore the materiality of early modern texts by focusing on the use of waste paper in book-making: that is, on fragments of older printed books used in the binding of newer printed books. What can we do with, and how can we think about, these recycled pieces of forgotten texts? I’ll hope to use waste paper to make a broader case for thinking anew about the materiality of texts.

Adam Smyth is Professor of English Literature and the History of the Book at Balliol College, Oxford. He works on the connections between literature and material texts, particularly in the 16th and 17th centuries. He is the author of four books, most recently Material Texts in Early Modern England (Cambridge University Press 2018), and is co-editor of four essay collections, including Book Parts with Dennis Duncan (Oxford University Press, 2019) . His next book, The Book: A Story in Thirteen Extraordinary Lives, is forthcoming with Bodley Head. 

All welcome! For further information, including online joining information, get in touch with research.icc@coventry.ac.uk. The address for the ICC Building (Institute of Creative Cultures) is: Parkside, Coventry University, Coventry, CV1 2NE

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Reading Group – Gendered Violence in Antiquity and Beyond

You are warmly invited to the next meeting of the Gendered Violence Reading Group on the 30th June, 3-4pm, on TEAMS.

We will be reading Andrea Dworkin’s ‘Against the Male Flood. Censorship, Pornography, and Equality’, which can be accessed here

For any queries, please email Daniel Anderson (ac8883@coventry.ac.uk) or Victoria Leonard (victoria.leonard@coventry.ac.uk)

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Activism in Contemporary Female Latin American Authors

You are warmly invited to the first online international conference on activism in literature by contemporary Latin American female writers. The event, organized by Dr Carolina Miranda (Victoria University of Wellington, NZ) and Dr Victoria Ríos Castaño (Coventry University) will take place online on Thursday 16th and Friday 17th June. Please note that the official language of the conference is Spanish.  Our keynote speakers are Professor Luisa Ballesteros (CY Cergy Paris Université) and Professor Susanna Regazzoni (Università Ca’ Foscari, Venezia). 

Issues to be discussed will include the writers’ denunciation of everyday discrimination, violence, sexual abuse, and femicide in Latin America. For the programme and free registration (open until Friday 10 June, 18.00 BST) see here. For queries, please contact ad1508@coventry.ac.uk

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CAMC International Conference: Orosius Through the Ages

The conference ‘Orosius Through the Ages’ took place 25-27 May 2022 online and at the Institute of Classical Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. The conference was co-organised by Victoria Leonard (CAMC Research Fellow), Elisa Manzo (University of Naples Federico II), and Cameron Wachowich (University of Toronto). It foregrounded two keynote speakers, Prof. Elizabeth M. Tyler (University of York) and Prof. Peter Van Nuffelen (Ghent University), as well as twenty-one presenters. The conference featured a Wikipedia editathon, supported by MedievalWiki. This event sought to improve the visibility of those who identify as women and non-binary in Orosian studies online, particularly on Wikipedia. Thank you to all of our speakers and delegates in-person and online for making the conference a wonderful success! For more images of the event and for more information, please the conference website.

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Reading Group – Gendered Violence in Antiquity and Beyond

You are warmly invited to the next meeting of the Gendered Violence Reading Group on the 27th April, 3-4pm. We will be reading Patricia B. Salzman-Mitchell, ‘Phantastic Text(iles)’, A Web of Fantasies: Gaze, Image, and Gender in Ovid’s Metamorphoses

For any queries, please email Daniel Anderson (ac8883@coventry.ac.uk) or Victoria Leonard (victoria.leonard@coventry.ac.uk)

Reading Group – Gendered Violence in Antiquity and Beyond

You are warmly invited to the next meeting of the Gendered Violence Reading Group on the 31st of March, 3-4pm. We will be reading Daniel Libatique’s 2021 article, ‘Ovid in the #MeToo Era’. 

Going forward, meetings of the Reading Group will take place on the final Thursday of the month. For any queries, please email Daniel Anderson (ac8883@coventry.ac.uk) or Victoria Leonard (victoria.leonard@coventry.ac.uk). 

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Victoria Leonard, Orosius Through the Ages

Victoria Leonard (CAMC Research Fellow) has organised an international conference, ‘Orosius Through the Ages’, 25-27 May 2022. The event will take place online and at the Institute of Classical Studies, School of Advanced Study, University of London. It features two keynote speakers, Prof. Elizabeth Tyler (University of York) and Prof. Peter Van Nuffelen (Ghent University), as well as twenty-one presenters. The conference is framed by a Wikipedia editathon, supported by MedievalWiki. This event aims to improve the visibility of those who identify as women and non-binary in Orosian studies on Wikipedia. The Call for Papers for the conference closed on 8 December 2021, and registration will open in due course.

For further information, please see the conference website here, or get in touch with Victoria: victoria.leonard@coventry.ac.uk.

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#RenSA22

Victoria Ríos Castaño and Patricia Phillippy join Madeline Bassnett, Western University (Canada) and chair Mihoko Suzuki for, ‘Climate Change in Pre-Industrial Europe and America: Texts, Artefacts, Attitudes’, a panel organised by Patricia for the Renaissance Society of America conference in Dublin, 30 March to 2 April 2022.

Victoria Ríos Castaño, ‘Setting the date for the Anthropocene: In search for clues in sixteenth-century Relaciones geográficas

Following Simon L. Lewis and Mark A. Maslin’s (2015) suggestion that the results of the “collision of the Old and New Worlds” (e.g. cross-continental movement of food species and domesticated animals and dramatic decline of indigenous populations) can help mark the beginning of the Anthropocene in 1610, this paper seeks to track down relevant data in late sixteenth-century Relaciones geográficas. These surveys, ordered by Juan López de Velasco, Philip II’s cosmographer-chronicler, for the composition of a comprehensive book on New World territories, contain information of a quantitative nature on physical and environmental geography, flora, and fauna, finance, government, and indigenous traditions, which has been deployed mostly in cartography and historical and cultural studies. In this paper, special focus will be placed on reports or answers to the 1577-1584 questionnaires, received from Guatemala, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Venezuela, on items concerning climate, illnesses, crops, and domesticated animals.

Patricia Phillippy, ‘Parochializing the Anthropocene: Changing Climates in the Early Modern Parish’

Following Dipesh Chakrabarty’s Provincializing Europe, criticism of contemporary postcolonial literature has sought strategies to “parochialize the Anthropocene;” that is, to ground this universal idea in specific times and places. In the early modern context, of course, the “parochial” is especially resonant, referring us to parish churches joined in webs of ecclesiastical polity across England. This paper responds to the recent geographic relocation of the Anthropocene in the early modern, pre-secular era, considering the continuities and discontinuities between Christian eschatology and contemporary Anthropocene discourses within the specific time and place of the pre-Reformation church. I explore how agricultural materiality resonates in secular and spiritual registers in William Austin’s monument for his mother, erected by Nicolas Stone in Southwark Cathedral (1633). Cultivating the metaphoric link between God as farmer and parishioners as crops (“Vos etis agricultura dei”), Austin erects a monument to the hybrid matter awash in the Columbian Exchange.

Madeline Bassnett, ‘Anticipating the Anthropocene: Chronicling Weather Extremes in Methley, Yorkshire’

It is now a commonplace to tie extreme weather to anthropocentric climate change. As The Economist observes, “Today’s rare extremes become tomorrow’s regular disturbances; tomorrow’s extremes are completely new” (May 16, 2020). But weather extremes do not happen in isolation; combinations of conditions—warmer oceans leading to stronger cyclones, for instance—create acute and unexpected results. Although the early modern English experienced global cooling rather than warming, they, too, encountered patterns of severe and unseasonal weather. This paper will examine reports of weather extremes in the commonplace book of Richard Shann, herbalist, orchard cultivator, and copyholder in the village of Methley, West Yorkshire (BL Add MS 38599). I argue that not only are chronicles and commonplace books a rich source of historical data, but also that this data anticipates the vagaries of Anthropocene weather.     

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